Topic: Time management

How Heads of School may help

Heads of School can help Unit Coordinators by helping with quality issues, managing sessional staff and facilitating collegiality. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Doing what is important

This experienced Unit Coordinator of architecture does little research but rather, focuses on nurturing this students’ creativity. He gets good feedback from his students so is left alone and can pretty much please him self. More…

Related Resources: , ,

No-one dies here

As a clinician and leader in a previous role, this Unit Coordinator applies the skills learnt then to this role. She provides practical and useful advice. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Coping with an unhelpful predecessor

This Unit Coordinator recounts the horror of starting in her role without any support and sharing of materials from her predecessor. She offers helpful advice to new coordinators starting out. More…

Related Resources: , , , ,

All that matters is research

This coordinator discusses the tension between teaching quality units and the expectation of writing 4 papers a year. As Assoc. Dean in L & T she has tried using innovative approaches to assisting new staff but finds that a direct approach to individual Unit Coordinators works best in terms of finding out what support they need. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Stepping into a challenging role

As Director of a student support centre, this academic highlights the challenges he initially faced in the role. While his varied responsibilities sometimes hamper his research goals he manages to maintain a research profile. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Give and take

With the flexibility and autonomy that the role provides, this coordinator has organised his role so that everyone ‘wins’ – himself, his students and the course. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Believe in yourself

There are lots of tips for new academics provided by this coordinator. More…

Related Resources: , , ,

Only here for the students

This Unit Coordinator describes her heavy teaching workload and the poor administration support she receives. Despite this she enjoys her time teaching and has received outside recognition for her efforts. She also describes her strategy to publish her work. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Teaching on short term contracts

After many years at his university this Unit Coordinator remains on contract employment. He describes his pleasure in working with previously unseen material, introducing different teaching strategies and recognising research opportunities. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Building rapport

Each semester this coordinator focuses on getting to know his students as quickly as possible. He feels this develops a comfortable rapport that enhances student learning. He uses the services offered to staff and students to advantage and remains focused on his purpose to improve student learning. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Supporting university learning and teaching

As Director of a T & L unit, supporting the coordinators is seen as critical. The development of an e-planner was an important step in alleviating some of the administration headaches from their role. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Prioritising my responsibilities

Despite five years experience as a unit coordinator this coordinator thinks it gets busier. With experience it becomes easier because you know what to do and how to do it but every year there are challenges. This year, for example, the electronic communications system was changed so she needed to learn the new system.
More…

Related Resources: , ,

Painting the Sydney Harbour bridge

Experience was obtained by this coordinator during six years at two different universities. He asked lots of questions to survive the early years and has learnt to compartmentalise the various responsibilities since. This has reduced anxiety although a sense of relentlessness and treading water prevail because he lacks the time to reflect, improve and excel. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Organised chaos

When she reflects upon her role this coordinator thinks ‘organised chaos’, labour intensity and the variety of abilities and skills she requires to perform all aspects of the role. She sees the time spent with staff as important to develop and support them. As a specialist she feels professionally isolated and worries about the rigour of developing a unit on her own. More…

Related Resources: , , ,