Topic: Staff development

Stories from Australian academics in unit coordination roles that touch on the topic of staff development.

Building confidence in teaching

I have worked in clinics as a nursing educator and in management roles. Before starting at this regional campus, I planned to retire but then I was offered and took on a part-time academic role. That was more than four … More…

Academic developers helping others

Changes to the role during the past 15 years are outlined here, particularly in relation to accountability expectations on Unit Coordinators. The Centre’s responsibilities and ‘tensions’ are also clarified. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Stepping into a challenging role

As Director of a student support centre, this academic highlights the challenges he initially faced in the role. While his varied responsibilities sometimes hamper his research goals he manages to maintain a research profile. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Making a difference

After documenting teaching behaviours and strategies that she appreciated as a student this Unit Coordinator shared her information with colleagues. Using innovative approaches in her lessons resulted in her receiving teaching awards and promotion to lead teaching and learning in her university school. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Going for promotion

To gain a promotion this coordinator has been told to demonstrate to the promotions committee how her teaching, research and unit coordination have impacted on her students’ learning and the university community. Demonstrating the impact of research is easy; the others are more difficult. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Give and take

With the flexibility and autonomy that the role provides, this coordinator has organised his role so that everyone ‘wins’ – himself, his students and the course. More…

Related Resources: , ,

An international transition

After gaining some credibility in her chosen field this Unit Coordinator emigrated from Eastern Europe. She describes her appreciation of the support provided to her on her arrival at an Australian university. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Supporting unit coordinators

As Head of a new clinical school, there was nothing in place and progress was made difficult for unit coordinators who were professional clinicians rather than academics. He sees his role as supportive and clearly outlines his expectations with new staff. He operates in a ‘fluid’ environment and relies heavily on the goodwill of staff, while also relying on the T & L team and student services for advice and practical assistance. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Micromanaging unit coordinators

Limited induction provided for new academics has led this coordinator to assist them. Her own learning was by trial and error. The T & L centre assists with policies. She feels valued but has issue with the limited recognition of time spent on unit coordination. There are workload discrepancies, which are not seen as fair. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Someone else can organise It

Working in the Health Sciences in a new position, this coordinator created a unit and curriculum from scratch, well supported by colleagues. He sees assessment as problematic in respect to strategy and marking consistency because student numbers are large. He would like to see improved communication between colleagues to reduce his feelings of isolation. More…

Related Resources: , ,

Leading the unit coordinators

This Head of School has extensive coordination experience in the sciences and understands the role well. He demonstrates his value of the team and provides extra support for new coordinators and those with large classes. The enjoyment ‘edge’ of the job has been removed by weekend work needed to stay on top of his responsibilities. More…

Related Resources: , ,

A kind of leader role

A first year lecturer in Science with heavy teaching load and ARC research feels like she is sinking at times. Her 1st year unit is large as is the admin load, which removes focus from student learning. There is greater flexibility to improve her 3rd year unit. She seeks advice from supportive colleagues as needed, and enjoys influencing student learning and the challenges of combining research and teaching.
More…

Related Resources: , ,